Dems who accused Trump of trying to jail opponents voice support for Trump grand jury indictment

Law enforcement prepares for Trump

Some House Democrats who previously convicted President Donald Trump They reacted differently to their threat to jail political opponents after a Manhattan grand jury decided to file criminal charges against the leading Republican presidential candidate.

“Threatening to jail political opponents is something dictators do. It’s dangerous and it’s bad for our great country,” Rep. Catherine Clark, the House whip minority, said on Twitter during an October 2016 presidential debate between Trump and a former Democrat. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

At the time Clark made her comments, Clinton was embroiled in an email scandal that threatened to derail her candidacy. Trump leaned heavily on scandal in the final weeks of the campaign, with “lock her up” becoming a common rallying cry at many Trump campaign events.

But Clark made no reference to such cases after Trump’s indictment, saying in a statement Thursday that “no one is above the law” and that the process should proceed “unimpeded and free from” political interference.

Trump’s Surrender Post-Manhattan Signal Delayed Due to Secret Service Intervention: Source

From left to right: Rep. Val Hoyle, Rep. Eric Swalwell, R-Calif., Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Rep. Kathryn Clark, D-Calif. Sean Casten, D-Ill.

From left to right: Rep. Val Hoyle, Rep. Eric Swalwell, R-Calif., Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Rep. Kathryn Clark, D-Calif. Sean Casten, D-Ill. (Anna Moneymaker, Tom Williams and Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call, Inc.)

“Fundamental to the strength and survival of democracy is the principle that no one is above the law – including the former president of the United States,” Clark said. “We must allow the judicial process to continue unimpeded and free from any form of political interference or intimidation. This is not a time for partisanship, but for all Americans to act peacefully and have faith in the justice system.”

“The core of our democracy is the rule of law,” Clark wrote on Twitter earlier this month. “However, the former president advocates violence and the Speaker defends it. This extremist behavior is dangerous and unpatriotic.”

After a years-long investigation from the office of Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg, a Manhattan grand jury voted Thursday to indict Trump. The exact charges for the indictment are still being wrapped up, but Trump attorney Joe Tacopina said Thursday night that Trump could face more than 30 charges next week when he is arraigned.

In August 2018, the former Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy PelosiD-Calif., quoting a New York Times article in which Trump warned he would turn “authoritarian” if Republicans could win that year’s midterm elections.

Pelosi, a California Democrat, speaks during a press conference at the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., on December 22, 2022.

Pelosi, a California Democrat, speaks during a press conference at the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., on December 22, 2022. (Ting Xin/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

And the quote reads: “If the Republicans hold both houses of Congress next November, Trump will go full blown tyranny, abuse institutions like the IRS, try to imprison dissidents and journalists … and he will do so with the full support of his party,” he said. It came in the quote, which Pelosi shared on Twitter.

But after news of Trump’s impeachment, Pelosi changed her tune, suggesting in a statement that her political opponent Trump would have to “prove” his innocence in court and that “no one is above the law.”

“The grand jury acted on the facts and the law,” Pelosi said. “No one is above the law, and everyone has the right to a trial to prove his innocence. We hope that the former president will peacefully respect the system that gives him this right.”

a lot Pelosi’s claim was criticized Trump has the right to a trial to prove his innocence. A fundamental tenet of the United States justice system is that anyone accused of a crime is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt in a court of law.

NANCY PELOSI Roasted on Trump’s Twitter handle says he has the right to ‘prove innocence’ at trial

Pelosi recently criticized Trump’s social media posts about his possible arrest, calling the former president “reckless” and accusing him of fomenting “unrest.”

Like Pelosi, Representative Sean Casten, a Democrat, shared the same New York Times article in August 2018. Casten recently targeted the Speaker of the House Kevin McCarty For opposing Trump’s impeachment, arguing that McCarthy should “deal [his] Work with the dignity you deserve,” in a post on Twitter.

Representative Sean Kasten, D, listens during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on December 13, 2022, in Washington, DC.

Representative Sean Kasten, D, listens during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on December 13, 2022, in Washington, DC. (Nathan Howard/Getty Images)

“This is transparent political hacking that is not befitting of the Speaker of the House,” Kasten said earlier this month in response to McCarthy. “You don’t know what he’s being charged with but you know exactly what violence he can do when he can count on people like you to intimidate instead of act.”

After Trump’s accusation, Kasten posted a one-word reaction on Twitter: “Boom.”

Casten took more scores on McCarthy in a Tweet-up On Thursday after the Speaker of Parliament claimed that Prague had “damaged our country beyond repair in an effort to interfere with our presidential elections”.

Casten wrote “You know nothing of the charges against him. But thank you for reminding us of your irreproachable cowardice.”

Kasten, who has represented Illinois in the House of Representatives since 2019, took aim at the GOP in a Separate tweetsaying he would not have been elected if the Republicans had “put the state on Trump in 2016”.

“I haven’t read the indictment yet. But I would never have ended up with this job if anyone from any authority in the GOP had put the state on Trump in 2016,” he wrote. “The persistence of their servile and ignorant cowardice tonight disgusts me. I am glad that good people stood up even as they sat down.”

Like Clark, Rep. Val Hoyle was also critical of Trump’s rhetoric during the election October 2016 discussion with Hillary Clinton, on Twitter to share a quote from Jefferson Smith, the former Oregon Rep., in apparent shock at Trump’s remarks.

The quote Hoyle shared at the time read: “A man running for president threatened to put his political opponents in jail.”

“Yeah, that just happened,” Hoyle said, referring to Trump’s remarks.

Trump’s lawyer, top legal experts respond to the reference: ‘The rule of law is dead’

But Hoyle remained silent after Trump was impeached. As of Friday, Howell has not yet commented on the matter via social media or through a press release on her website.

Hoyle’s office did not immediately respond to Fox News Digital about the indictment.

Another prominent House Democrat, Representative Eric Swalwell From California, he also criticized Trump’s calls for Clinton to be imprisoned after the 2016 election, arguing that such rhetoric threatened to make the United States a “banana republic”.

Representative Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., speaks at a press conference at the US Capitol on January 25, 2023, in Washington, DC.

Representative Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., speaks at a press conference at the US Capitol on January 25, 2023, in Washington, DC. (Kevin Deitch/Getty Images)

“Glad he didn’t make us a banana republic by imprisoning enemies,” Swalwell said of Trump in November 2016, adding that he was still “angry” Trump “blatantly lied” about this and other things to win. “

However, after Trump’s indictment was revealed Thursday, Swalwell did not condemn the decision, but said it represented a “bleak day” in America and that Trump “deserves all the protections afforded him” by the law.

“The indictment of an ex-president is a sad day for America,” Swalwell wrote in a tweet. “It is also time to believe in our justice system. Donald Trump deserves every protection the Constitution affords him. And when this unfolds, let us not celebrate and not destroy. Justice benefits us all.”

In recent weeks, Swalwell has targeted McCarthy over the speaker’s apparent lack of support to impeach Trump.

“The man who set up a commission to look into ‘arming the government’ is using his powers of government to stop the independent prosecution of his boss,” Swalwell said of McCarthy on Twitter earlier this month.

Bragg asked Trump to surrender his office Friday, but a source familiar with the matter said Fox News Digital said This schedule has been extended due to necessary arrangements to be made by the Secret Service. The source told Fox News Digital that Trump will “probably” give up on Tuesday.

The indictment against Trump comes after Bragg was investigating Trump over silent money payments made prior to the 2016 presidential election. These include $130,000 payments to adult film actress Stormy Daniels, and $150,000 paid to a former Playboy model. Karen McDougal.

Former President Donald Trump was indicted by a Manhattan grand jury on Thursday following a years-long investigation by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg.

Former President Donald Trump was indicted by a Manhattan grand jury on Thursday following a years-long investigation by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg. (Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

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Fox News reported and revealed in 2018 a series of Silent money payments to both McDougal and Daniels, and the US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York and the Federal Election Commission investigated these payments.

Federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York chose not to charge Trump in connection with the Daniels payments in 2019, even when Michael Cohen, Trump’s former attorney, was implicated as part of a plea bargain. The Federal Election Commission has also dumped its investigation into the matter in 2021.

Fox News’ Brock Syneman and Lauren Taylor contributed to this article.

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