Kelce brothers want Chiefs superfan, who is at large for allegedly robbing bank, to tell his story on podcast

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Kelce brothers want Kansas City Chiefs Big fan, ChiefsAholic, to join the “New Heights” podcast soon.

The fan also happens to be wanted in Oklahoma after allegedly skipping bail after being arrested in a bank robbery in December.

Philadelphia Eagles Center Jason Kelsey took to Twitter to invite the ChiefsAholic, whose real name is Xavier Babudar, to tell him and his younger brother, Travis, his story.

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A Kansas City Chiefs fan known as the ChiefsAholic at the San Francisco 49ers game on October 23, 2022, at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California.

A Kansas City Chiefs fan known as the ChiefsAholic at the San Francisco 49ers game on October 23, 2022, at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California. (Bob Kupbens/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

“Chiefsaholic, I don’t know where you are, but my brother and I would love to have you on @newheightshow to tell your story. We’ll go anywhere, not reveal anything for the press.”

Bapodar is wanted on a $1 million injunction after allegedly removing his ankle monitor and skipping a court hearing Monday morning. The authorities could not find him.

If Babodar is found, he will be held on a $1 million bond, according to Fox 4 Kansas City.

Superfan heads in a row after allegedly skipping court hearing on bank robbery charges: officials

Babodar’s initial arrest came in December when he robbed a bank in Tulsa County on his way to a Chiefs game in New York City Houston vs. Texas. Bapodar was accused of robbery with a dangerous weapon and assault while masked or disguised.

Witnesses to the robbery at the Tulsa Teachers Credit Union said the suspect pointed a gun at an employee’s chest, and demanded $100 bills from inside the bank vault. The arrest report added that the suspect said he would “put a bullet in the employee’s head” if the money was not offered. Bapodar is later identified as the bank robber.

Chiefs fans know Bapodar well, but not by his real identity. Wearing a full wolf mask and outfit with Chiefs gear during home and away games, he quickly became a staple in the stands on Sundays.

ChiefsAholic before Super Bowl LV between the Buccaneers and the Kansas City Chiefs at Raymond James Stadium on February 7, 2021, in Tampa, Florida.

ChiefsAholic before Super Bowl LV between the Buccaneers and the Kansas City Chiefs at Raymond James Stadium on February 7, 2021, in Tampa, Florida. (Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

Since he was always around no matter where, fans were concerned when he wasn’t present for the Chiefs-Texans game on December 18, 2022. It was because he was arrested and jailed.

He wasn’t wearing a wolf outfit then. Instead, as the shipping document states, Bapodar wore a paintball mask, ski goggles, gloves, and an all-green outfit with a CO2 gun.

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Babodar’s actions earned one comment from a fan under Jason Kelsey’s tweet asking him to come on the podcast, saying, “Don’t make a hero out of someone who puts a gun to someone else’s head. Come on, you (sic) are better than that.”

“I appreciate that,” replied Kelsey, “I certainly wouldn’t make him a hero.”

Babudar had told the court that he was homeless and could not afford a lawyer. His application also stated that he had not worked since 2020, even though he had paid $8,000 for bail.

Xavier Babodar reserved photo

Xavier Babodar reserved photo (Tulsa County Jail)

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Bapodar allegedly tampered with his ankle monitor on March 25, and authorities did not find him at the scene with the monitor in a wooded area of ​​Tulsa.

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