U.K. scientists find one of largest black holes ever discovered

Giant black hole

UK astronomers They discovered one of the largest black holes ever found.

The team, led by Durham University, used gravitational lensing to find the supermassive black hole.

Gravitational inversion occurs when a celestial body has such a strong gravitational force that it warps space-time around it, causing light from a distant object to be bent and amplified.

They also used supercomputer simulations at the DiRAC integrated supercomputing facility, allowing researchers to study how light is bent by a black hole inside a galaxy hundreds of millions of light-years away.

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An artist's impression of a black hole, in which the intense gravitational field of a black hole warps the space around it.  This distorts images of the background light, lined up almost directly behind it, into distinct circular rings.  This cuteness "lens" The effect offers an observational way to infer the existence of black holes and measure their mass, based on how significant the bending of light is.  The Hubble Space Telescope targets distant galaxies, whose light passes near the centers of intervening foreground galaxies, which are expected to host supermassive black holes a billion times the mass of the Sun.

An artist’s impression of a black hole, in which the intense gravitational field of a black hole warps the space around it. This distorts images of the background light, lined up almost directly behind it, into distinct circular rings. The “lens” gravitational effect provides an observational method for inferring the existence of black holes and measuring their mass, based on how significant the bending of light is. The Hubble Space Telescope targets distant galaxies, whose light passes near the centers of intervening foreground galaxies, which are expected to host supermassive black holes a billion times the mass of the Sun. (ESA/Hubble, Digitized Sky Survey, Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org), N. Bartmann)

A university statement said the group simulated light traveling through the universe hundreds of thousands of times, with each simulation including a different mass black hole – changing the light’s journey to Earth.

By including a supermassive black hole in one of their simulations, they found that the path taken for light from the galaxy to reach Earth matches the path seen in real images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

They found a supermassive black hole In the foreground galaxy – an object with a mass of more than 30 billion times the mass of the Sun.

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An astronaut aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis captured this image with the Hubble Space Telescope on May 19, 2009.

An astronaut aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis captured this image with the Hubble Space Telescope on May 19, 2009. (NASA)

Durham University said this is the first black hole detected using gravitational lensing. Durham University astronomer Professor Alastair Edge first noticed the giant arc of a gravitational lens when reviewing the Galactic Survey images in 2004.

Says the lead author, Dr. James Nightingale said in a statement.

This observation from the NASA/ESA/Canadian Space Agency's James Webb Space Telescope features the massive galaxy cluster RX J2129.  Due to gravitational lensing, this observation contains three different images of the same supernova host galaxy, which you can see in closer detail here.  Gravitational lensing occurs when a massive celestial body causes enough curvature of space-time to bend the path of light passing through or through it, almost like a wide lens.  Gravitational reversal can cause background objects to appear oddly distorted, as can be seen by the concentric arcs of light in the upper right of this image.

This observation from the NASA/ESA/Canadian Space Agency’s James Webb Space Telescope features the massive galaxy cluster RX J2129. Due to gravitational lensing, this observation contains three different images of the same supernova host galaxy, which you can see in closer detail here. Gravitational lensing occurs when a massive celestial body causes enough curvature of space-time to bend the path of light passing through or through it, almost like a wide lens. Gravitational reversal can cause background objects to appear oddly distorted, as can be seen by the concentric arcs of light in the upper right of this image. (ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, P. Kelly)

“but, Gravitational lensing makes this possible To study inactive black holes, something not currently possible in distant galaxies. This approach could allow us to discover more black holes outside our local universe and reveal how these exotic objects evolved back in cosmic time,” said the Physics Department professor.

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The results of a study – also involving Germany’s Max Planck Institute – are published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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